How The Wood Market Can Help Save Tropical Forests

The legality, sustainability, and profitability offered by green tropical wood supply chains.

However, such procurement laws and policies may be unclear to producers, importers, and merchants, who may have concerns about the documentation they need and the standards they must meet. This confusion can reduce the commercial opportunities of tropical timber producers, especially those that operate on a small scale and with minimal capacity or business support.

Therefore, a systems-based approach is needed to ensure legality and sustainability in ‘green’ supply chains that are integrated and that work for small, medium, and large operators.

The ultimate goal of green supply chains is to ensure a stable and reliable supply of wood that comes from legal and sustainable sources. They are also important to promote progress towards a biologically based circular economy, in which wood can be used as a substitute for non-renewable materials and energy, produced in a non-sustainable way.

The ultimate goal of green supply chains is to ensure a stable and reliable supply of wood that comes from legal and sustainable sources.

Companies that implement sustainable supply chains will know exactly where their products are from, where they are at any time, and how they have been produced. Finally, the efficiency of this information will ensure profitability and will favor companies in other ways as well.

However, this is more than just a forest certification. Certification is playing a valuable role in using market power to improve forest performance. However, it has had relatively little impact on most tropical forests due to structural barriers that must be systematically addressed.

Creating green wood supply chains involves multiple levels of action and commitment from a wide variety of stakeholders who need to interact in coordination. However, most tropical timber-producing countries lack sufficient infrastructure and technology to establish them. Public-private partnerships – both at the national level and with consumer countries – are vital for cost-sharing and the supply chain to be viable.